Bundesliga Betting: What To Know About Germany’s Top Men’s Club Soccer League

Posted on May 10, 2020

Live sports are slowly returning around the world. That means sportsbooks are ramping action on them back up as well, and Bundesliga betting is a welcome addition to the current catalog.

For many bettors in the United States, familiarity with Germany’s top men’s club soccer league may be minimal. Because the opportunities should be abundant, it’s time to learn about Bundesliga.

When will Bundesliga betting markets be available in New Hampshire?

The simple answer to that question is right now. As long as you’re of legal age, which in New Hampshire is 18 instead of 21, and physically within the Granite State’s borders, you can get in on this action.

For now, DraftKings has a state-protected “monopoly” in terms of legal online sports betting. Fortunately for New Hampshirites, DraftKings offers a wide array of wagers on Bundesliga right now.

Those include straight bets on matches, spreads and totals. Additionally, there are futures markets for each club’s finishing position and whether each club will finish in the top 10 of the league.

DraftKings also offers several game, player and team props. Those include scores at the end of halves, players to score goals first in matches and which team will score first in specific matches.

The great variety of markets means there’s a lot of chances to cash in on Bundesliga. That also means a steep learning curve for those unfamiliar with the league.

Crash course on Bundesliga for NH bettors

Perhaps the most important piece of information is that Bundesliga will resume play on May 16. It will do so in stadiums without spectators in attendance for now, however.

Bundesliga is the top level of men’s club soccer in Germany, but it’s not the only level. The league contains 18 clubs, and unlike in Canada and the United States, those clubs aren’t always the same from one year to the next.

The Deutsch Football League governs Bundesliga and the lower tiers of soccer in Germany. The system includes promotion and relegation, a foreign concept to American sports fans.

Bundesliga is in a promotion/relegation fixture with what’s called Bundesliga 2. Each year, the 16th-place club in the final Bundesliga table (point standings) and the third-place club in Bundesliga 2 play two matches against each other to determine relegation.

If one team wins both matches, that team is in Bundesliga the next year, with the losing team taking a spot in Bundesliga 2. There’s an incentive for finishing in the top four of the table as well, as those clubs get to participate in the UEFA Champions League.

Other than the relegation playoff, there is no postseason for Bundesliga clubs. Whichever team finishes at the top of the table after the season concludes is the champion for that year.

Bundesliga plays a round-robin schedule during its fixture (season), with each club playing all the others away and at home. That means each club plays 34 matches each fixture.

The rules for play in Bundesliga are pretty standard for men’s top-flight leagues throughout Europe. Because of that, Bundesliga employs some of the best talent around the world, including from North America.

Where to find what you need to handicap Bundesliga

Although Bundesliga is a German league, it counts millions of fans around the globe. For that reason, it’s possible to find good sources of information about Bundesliga in English.

Perhaps the best source of free editorial and news about Bundesliga is BBC Sport. It devotes a lot of coverage to Bundesliga, and that’s especially true right now since no leagues in the UK are active.

You can find detailed information about injuries, scores and statistics by going straight to the source. Bundesliga provides an English-language site for its fans whose German isn’t the best.

Bundesliga betting is a welcome sight for New Hampshirites who crave high-profile sports. If you’re able to handicap these matches well, there are plenty of opportunities to win.

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Derek Helling

Derek Helling is a freelance journalist who resides in Kansas City, Mo. He is a 2013 graduate of the University of Iowa and covers the intersections of sports with business and the law.

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